Well we’ve been thinking about how we could make a video that could help those less fortunate than ourselves! For example our friend the ‘test subject’ finds it difficult to have a conversation and so straight away we helped him to learn the essential skills of how to engage in a simple conversation. A nice easy task we thought…how wrong we were! Enjoy!

When first coming up with this idea, we wanted to see how easy it would be to make a duplicate of the same person talking to himself. At first we thought this shouldn’t be too difficult, in fact we knew it would be quite easy. It was just a question of split screen and simple masking. So to make things more interesting we decided to have the conversation filmed from two different angles. But that’s just as simple you would think? Well not when you only have the one camera!

First was of course to try out some test footage to see if the idea would actually work. Obviously we wanted to make this idea work, but also to work as simply as possible as time was (as always) running against us.

Original test footage

Original test footage

Side view of test footage

Side view of test footage

The testing of the short film (shooting/editing wise) worked well and we were happy to go ahead and attempt to create a short masterpiece! However we changed the original outline of the idea from having a basic conversation to having someone try to teach the duplicate/clone HOW to have a conversation. We thought this because then there would be more of a chance to show how the two protagonists would actually annoy each other and thus creating more of a comedy aspect to the short!

With the added script (well, improvised script ) updated we thought it was time to begin filming. The only problem was that we needed to hear the responses of the first conversation/questions so the second protagonist could give the correct responses back. Luckily a certain phone made by Apple came with a voice recording capability so whilst recording the actual shot, we recorded the one sided conversation on the phone as well! Then with the camera remaining still we changed to the second character in our short and played the original voice recording (the questions) from the phone so the appropriate reactions could be given at the right cue!

Original footage before edit.

Original footage before edit

Filming responses before edit

Filming responses before edit

Thats when we encountered a problem. If we were to film a separate angle, we would have to make sure the dialogue (which was mainly improvised) was the same on the second shot. So for this we then had to seriously use our head. But lucky for us because (being honest now) the shot of the first angle had to be done over many takes, we had actually began to learn the improvised dialogue/questions so when the second angle was set up, we then mimed the original conversation and edited the original sound from the first take over it in post production.

Side view during edit

Side view during edit

There was actually a third shot filmed for the short production, and although this did actually work well, we realised that we were crossing the sacred 180 degree line which would then confuse audiences and take away the comedic aspect of the short that we were trying to create.

Rear camera shot removed in final edit

Rear camera shot removed in final edit

And so after masking the two takes and editing them together as well as matching up the dialogue, we were then left with the finished production that you see today. Although we were pleased with how it turned out, we still think that the original test footage conversation actually worked better. But in the test footage the eyelines of our two characters do not match up and hence why we released the true version instead of the test one. We hope you enjoy(ed) it either way!

 

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